Writing is cheaper than therapy or drugs.

Sometimes you wish for something so hard and then it actually comes true. Has that happened to you? Against countless odds and still, your wish actually came true. Does it count as being lucky or should you be careful about hitching your hopes up too high? I’ve been thinking these thoughts for a while now. I’ve been thinking so much about it and I’ve also been trying not to think at all.

So much has happened since the last time I was here, blogger friends. So. Much. Where do I start from and how do I explain any of this? I am not sure. But I want to take it one step at a time. Keep my emotions in check. Make sure I’m not borrowing more happiness than I deserve to have in my share.

I can’t write like I used to. I’m putting that out there so you can decide whether to read further. This will be another of those journal style entries and while I could’ve just used my diary I cannot risk anyone laying their hands on these thoughts, again. I can, however, trust people I’ve never met. It’s something I do effortlessly.

I remember reaching a point in my life where I kept telling myself that if a particular thing was possible, I would do this and if this particular thing happened then I could do that and the conditions and clauses were infinite. I remember that life had become monotonous only running on that little proverbial speck of light at the far end of the dark tunnel. An endless pile of possibilities while I sunk down deeper and deeper and pretended I was fine – hopeful even. I did everything that was asked of me and I remember all too well – even though I wished I didn’t – what I received in return.

But now it’s time to forget everything I remember.

Maybe someday when I want to go back and experience pain and disappointment and need to write something of the sort I can resurface those memories. Maybe someday they’ll actually be useful.

But not now. Not when I’m this happy. Not when I’m finally getting everything I’ve wanted for so long.

I was on the phone with a friend the other day and I told him, “Everything worked out. This is really happening.”

He replied, “I’m actually happy for you.”

I said, “…okay, thank you?”, not sure about the tone in his voice.

He clarified, “I’m never really happy for anyone but I mean it, I’m happy for you.”

And I said to him, and to myself, really, “Everything is perfect except my writing. I can’t write.” I took a pause and added, “Though I’ve been reading a lot.”

He and I discussed it a bit more but I couldn’t make sense of it and changed the topic soon enough.

I think about writing a lot. More than I actually write I spend hours on end thinking about it. The words float around in my mind and it’s my personal heaven right there. Writing was what helped me and writing was what brought me ashore and it was writing that ultimately led me to the best things in my life. It’s hard to bring up anything else to par with it. Yet, I told my friend quickly that I was reading a lot and it wasn’t me trying to backpedal. When I can’t write, I read. Is that supposed to be some sort of consolation to the sad fact that my writing is no good? Does that even come close? I’m not sure if that makes sense. If my reading compensates for the part of my life where I’m unable to write well, is it a much truer love than writing?

Maybe going back to a repressed memory will help me understand.

When I was younger I started reading, collecting and hoarding books while children my age were going out and being social after school hours. Sometimes I remember being asked how I had spent my evening and I realized that the response was the same, every time. With my books. I grew up with words more than I did with people my age. I grew up in different times and different places through the escape provided in the book realm, obviously I felt no need to go anywhere. When I reached an age where subtle romance and other emotional references in books started making sense, I desired to write them down for keeps. I picked up sentences and emotions behind them and started jotting them down as I read them. I wanted to come back to these words and inspect them when the time was right and when I felt the way the characters in the books did. I knew better to keep these notes and pages concealed because my mother would not have been pleased to find them. The reasons for which are so fragile, so complicated and difficult to make anyone understand especially if they haven’t met her. However, soon enough she found the pages.

The scribbles of words and expressions of emotions so much more mature and deep than she expected I was reading. I remember sitting frozen as she put on her glasses and read each and every thing and glanced up at me once with an expression that guaranteed me that I was in a lot of trouble. Who would’ve thought reading and wanting to preserve what you read would be such a heinous crime? I couldn’t think that way then. As far as I knew, I was so scared at what would happen next I couldn’t move a muscle, afraid that I’d wet myself. (I had poor bladder control when I was younger.) While she read through all of them, handling the pages with no care whatsoever, I knew something inside me broke. It was over. Years later I understood reading was my first love. The heartbreak I felt when she stood up, tore the pages into bits and pieces and burned them on the stove will never equal to anything any mortal being has made me feel. In that moment I knew, I didn’t need to copy things other writers wrote. Because my mother would find them and throw them away and probably stop me from reading completely. Which she did, for a while. (Though, I started reading secretly at school again and no one really stopped me there.)

I wasn’t reading anything forbidden but I wonder what my mother thought I was going to do with words. She knew, probably, that words have unprecedented power. I then read books and tried to mark subtle dots in between alphabets and scratches on pages that I wanted to go back to. I then read books and memorized things in my mind because I knew my mother couldn’t get inside my head and tear up my memory. And then suddenly, it came to me that I didn’t have to depend on someone else’s words. I didn’t have to hide and read books when I could one day, write my own.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been so unimaginably happy but I couldn’t come back here to establish that on my blog. I’ve come here in the past and ranted and shared my apprehensions so many times. I’ve even had to leave this place and come back with a different identity and conceal parts of me after that, but I’ve always been around. Is writing about happiness really all that difficult? Why is my writing so afraid of being found out? Am I really never going to be able to write anything good enough and always hide myself behind this anonymity? Was my mother only trying to protect me from eventually realizing my inadequacies, the portent of failures to come? Then again, as Rita Brown rightly put it, “A writer’s life is not designed to reassure your mother.”

A few weeks back I finished Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking and my life was put back into perspective. I thought to myself, “I’m glad I can’t write. I’m glad my writing isn’t good enough now because I can appreciate her words so much better. I can see that her sentences are so fluid and so perfect and her thoughts are untainted by the way other people think and express themselves.” I could connect to how Didion felt the pain of being separated from her husband, also a writer. I felt tears of tremendous joy pour down my face when John, her husband, read out a passage of her book for her on her birthday and after closing the book he said, “Goddamn. Don’t ever tell me you can’t write. That’s my birthday present to you.” I reeled over when Didion expressed the fact that it took her a year after John’s sudden death to realize he’s not coming back. I took excerpts of various pages of this book as I read it and sent them to the person I love, also a writer. I was able to explain, in whatever way I needed to satisfy myself, to another person how words move me and how I connect with them. This person has, on several occasions made me realize that my love for words, for books, for book people, for random internet writers is completely sane. He said once, and I quote, “I will champion your literary appetite’s every whim.” To be able to simply share pages with someone of a book I lived vicariously through is a joy I can’t see being compared to anything else and I couldn’t have done it if I was immersed in my writing.

I think that sometimes you spend your entire life searching for people who understand you and then you find someone who does and everyone else in your life suddenly starts falling short to this standard. I explained to my friend that leaving home like this does not affect me because in my heart and mind I had already left this place long back. People ask me if I’m going to miss them and while I know that I will go back and think of them sometimes, I will reminisce and recall fondly moments with them that made me who I am today but I will not be able to imagine going back just for the sake of those things. Home was a place I never fit in fully. Although I was sure that one day I would leave, the difference is I was not sure if I’d have anywhere to come back to. I read somewhere an odd poem of sorts which went along the lines:

How to be unloved

Lose all family,

By chance or by coincidence…

I think about those words now and I wonder if it was chance or coincidence or it was something else entirely. Destiny, maybe? I told my friend that there comes a point in life when for better or for worse a family is finished. I guess finding a safe place in someone’s heart is enough family anyone can need. And finding someone that inspires your writing, someone that respects it and believes in it even when you can’t find the courage to do so, enough love anyone can need.

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487 responses

    1. Words have unprecedented power, yes.

      Liked by 3 people

  1. It is wonderful, how easily and precisely you can form your really complicated thoughts into words. Ive been studying linguistics in my country, though Ive been always also deeply interested into psychology. Ive set it as my goal to read and follow your blog, cause it might be a great source of language and information for me. Im grateful for this, youve made my evening : )

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Putting my thoughts into words, the effort that goes in channeling yourself to write is what helped me, always. Psychology is certainly an interesting field and I would strongly recommend Daniel Kahneman’s book Thinking, Fast and Slow. Maybe not as a daily read but since it’s completely non-fiction and a little heavy take it chapter by chapter when you feel like. It has opened up my mind so much and helped me understand my impulse reactions and my second-guessing actions.

      Thank you for your comment which I can keep with me forever and has made my day even better than I could imagine.

      Liked by 4 people

      1. Thats the real blend of words Sloppy… keep the fire Burning.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thank you for your reply! Yes, sloppy! I am a brand new writer and am required to do this as part of my contract. My ghostwritter, is very skilled, thank God. I appreciate all comments and they inspire me.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. Summed this up perfectly x

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Follow me please my blog💕

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This was a great post. I have hit those roadblocks before, even just recently. As a teen, I used writing poetry to handle depression. As an adult, I have used fiction writing to find some sort of semblance of sanity. Unfortunately, this has led to inconsistent writing. I think that you just have to find a way to make it work. Best of luck to you !

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Writing, in any form, be it poetry, fiction or non-fiction is a kind of escape. I rely on poetry when nothing else feels right in my life. I lean into fiction when I need inspiration. And non-fiction when I want to feel grounded and in-sync with reality. There’s nothing like inconsistency if you flit from poetry to fiction or any other form. You only have to write and write endlessly. Someone once told me, “The world is more afraid of you than you are of it.” I read that advice and then sit down to write and the words simply flow.

      Liked by 5 people

  4. Awesome post!

    HempHausMag.com

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I tried but unfortunately it says your blog doesn’t exist.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. You’re writing is heartfelt and I felt what you have felt, I read when I can’t write and I just think it’s because there’s only so much writing you can do before you need to re fuel your brain. I am pleased that you’re happy but don’t give up hope with writing x

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It means a lot when someone tells me they connect to my words and have felt the same way. Reading will always be my first love affair. And how do you ever forget your first love? Even when you’re being forced to. Especially when you’re being forced to. I read even when my mother showered her wrath on me, so how can I leave it be now when my life is so much better? These are the things I thought about while writing this blog. I will never give up, thank you so much.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No please don’t because you’re writing is beautiful x

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I like this phrase “I guess finding a safe place in someone’s heart is enough family anyone can need. ” I’ve found it to be true.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Because family is what you are simply handed out without any choice. But who can stop you from going out and finding your own tribe and finding that they can love you better?

      Liked by 3 people

  7. 👍👍👍

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks for the many thumbs ups!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. So many sentences begin with I

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I know. I think it was intentional. I always try to create certain repetitions in my writing. I feel it creates a rhythm. I better stop now.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Hahahaha. Very funny, like that!

        Like

  9. This was a very well written post well done 😁

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, it means a lot.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Powerful, honest, poignant words.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Wow. Thank you for using the best set of adjectives, I’m speechless.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I like this article so much 😉

        Like

        1. That means the world to me!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Usually I will reblog only the article that I like.

            Like

  11. Absolutely breathtaking. I came back to WordPress this afternoon in search of words worth reading, a trouble I have been having in recent years (no offense to the blogging community), and you did not disappoint. I feel your happiness, your every emotion you describe here. And your childhood recollection brings back fondness of my own memories in which I too spend long winter nights and hot summer days in different lands with different characters, all from the shelter of my bed covers. My mother nor father disapproved of my bookish habits, however past a certain age I decided, in an act of utter folly, that I should not read certain books anymore because “that’s not what grown-ups read.” The years following that decision took a mighty toll on my reading health, and for a very long time I was unable to break beneath the surface of any story. Even films I would analyze from a production standpoint; holes in the plot, lighting tricks, dialogue delivery. Everything mechanical. Nothing could ever be purely a delight for my imagination.
    Recently, however, I have joined the writer’s guild at my workplace (fittingly, I work at a bookstore) and I’ve already received so much support in rehabilitating an imagination long dormant. Sorry this comment turned into a novella, by the way. I suppose your words inspired mine to rise up and meet them.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Firstly, never apologize for your beautiful words. Novella length comments don’t just please me, they make me overjoyed. I have read your comment so many times now and all I can say is, thank you. Thank you for understanding, for sharing what you felt after reading my post.
      Writing might be better than many other forms of escape, but reading takes away the grand prize. I am also quite interested in the movie scene and want to look at doing professional movie reviews someday. My reviews, currently, are not so technical and more like a breakdown of the plot and the characters.
      Working at a bookstore sounds like my personal heaven but I’m academically not focusing on anything even close to words. I wish you good luck and once again, thank you. Readers like you make everything possible for writers like me.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I don’t have the right words to express what I am feeling right now, because I am feeling so many things and all of them are huge and powerful and some of them are painful and sad, others are sweet yet there is an ache to them.

    I guess all I can say is “Thank you”.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Without even trying you’ve already connected to me and explained what you’re feeling. That’s what words are capable of. I have always wanted to be able to render someone overwhelmed like this.
      I want to say,”Thank you to YOU! Readers like you make everything possible.”

      Like

  13. Thank you for sharing this thought, and I can definitely relate. Writing is definitely the best anti-depressant. And, I have to note that, in my opinion, when we understand ourselves and become comfortable with who we are, we discover who we are as writers. Like E. Hemingway once said, really, : ” There is not much to writing. You just sit at a typewriter and bleed.”

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You quoted one of my favourite Ernest Hemingway lines.
      This post was so personal and to find so many people appreciate and respect my words means the world to me. I’ve had no luck with therapy nor any exposure to drugs. Writing was the only cure and will always be my safe place. I’ve grown so much as a person just through typing these words and emotionally bleeding into my writing.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I went through the same thing – therapy, anti depressant after anti depressant, in the end writing saved my live more than anything or anyone else. Stay strong!:)

        Like

  14. I completely agree with you. Lately I have been under a ton of stress and unloading it through writing is very effective for me next to running.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I will admit, running and even sketching have that placating effect. Hang in there and when you’re stressed remember the empty page is your personal canvas. Just write.

      Liked by 2 people

  15. I dont know why, but after reading this I dont want to write for others anymore. You know, most of authors representate themselves through the words they have written. By reading their books, we secretly are digging into their personal life. It is ao inevitable to write about our own personal life, that sometimes words are come from our experiences; through what we have felt and seen, and we throw them on the papers. So when others can comprehend it perfectly, and judge both the story and the author, how can we handle it? How can we tell those who are being offended by our words? And this is the thing that has been preventing me from writing my novels further. Because fiction ain’t different from reality.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I have been through the same thing. In fact, I think there’s no way I can write fiction without having it intersect with my reality. I cannot write things I do not feel or connect to. I did an experiment writing a short story and if anyone I personally knew read it they’d know exactly who and what situation in my life it was inspired by. Doesn’t help that I wrote it in first person.
      For a long time, I’ve not been able to separate the art from the artist. Getting so emotionally invested in writers I’ve never met and only realizing much later that they’re not what I picked up about them from their writing. Do you think writing under a pseudonym will help you explore your honest writing without the fear of judgement?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Maybe yes, becoming an anonymous will save you out of judgement. But where is the truth in it? When an author becomes a great one and no one in the same time, where’s the truth? Writing isn’t a lie. It’s an honesty above of all; the utterance of our deep thoughts. That can’t be lying.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Hi. My name is J. I am 17 years old and I love words and everything they encompass. The title of your blog entry intrigued me. I read the first few sentences and I was gone. You don’t know me of course, but I want to thank you for writing what resembles an excerpt from the life I have now. Your entry moved something in me and I agree wholeheartedly that, “Writing is cheaper than therapy or drugs.”

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Hi, J. After I read your comment I sent a snapshot of it to my special person I’ve mentioned in this post. I said to him, “There are other people who feel the same way.” So honestly, thank YOU.

      I’m glad you found something in my words you could connect to. I will also use this comment to point out that the title of this blog is from Roxanne Gay’s book Bad Feminist. It inspired me and led to this story. If you need to chat, you can check out my Contact Me section and we could delight in each other’s kindred spirits.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Yes, this one was very good

      Like

  17. Wow! You put into writing all I feel and all I think! I want to put it on “paper”, if you can do that by putting it on the Web – my fear, will I be eloquent enough? Will I get across what I feel and think? Will I be discovered to then be laughed at, and be told “who are you kidding, you can’t hide from us”, and “you are ridiculous”! Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’ve had this happen to me in the past. A blog I curated with so much love and aspirations only to find it land in the wrong hands. I then had to delete all of it. I didn’t know where to write after that. I was cautious with my writing on this blog, forever afraid of being discovered. But see what happened when I finally let go. This is my most personal, raw piece of writing and it got Freshly Pressed.
      My thoughts are, start with anonymity and only tell a few important people about your blog. Let the rest of this beautiful world be your reader audience and find your writing and connect to it, at the same time while they wonder who you really are. When the time is right, and if you feel up to it, reveal your identity. If not, you can just be anonymous, like how I am.
      P.S. You are so far from ridiculous.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I started and stopped, had as a draft a writing on my new blog. I FINALLY finished it and published it today. I have two – one is plainly called My life, love, emotions under Brknbtrfly’s. The other is “My dreams of who i am, who I wish to be”. Thats the one i blogged today. Thank you for giving me the inspiration.

        Like

        1. I find that my best blogs are the ones I leave halfway in my drafts and get back to much later with a fresh perspective. I’ll go and read yours in a while.
          I’m happy to have inspired you. It means the world to me.

          Liked by 2 people

  18. I can’t come rely relate to this. I have one post on here(which I feel is terribly written) and it’s mostly a rant and an expression of my feelings. And I feel I can’t take it anywhere. But your speaking the truth. I would love to write daily and write on here but I can not do it either. I put more faith into strangers I do not know reading my well word vomit really then wanting anyone I know reading. This is really something special you’ve written here. Give your self credit. You’ve at least inspired one person to continue to truck on. Me. And I thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I can really relate to this!***

      Liked by 2 people

    2. It’s so amazing to find that people can respect your deepest, darkest stories and uphold them with so much love. Having inspired at least one person is enough to keep me going. Please write. Write endlessly. Write when you would much rather be doing something else. Write when you can’t do anything else. Just write. Believe me, that’s what helped me and that’s what led to this post.
      Lastly, thank you for your kind words. I am keeping them forever.

      Like

      1. Thank you for opening my “door” so I can begin to write again.

        Liked by 1 person

  19. Been there, done that, went there again and repeat.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The carousel never stops turning. You can’t get off.

      Liked by 2 people

  20. Reblogged this on liz38.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. You just put my feelings into words, especially that part about having people understand you. I read that and I felt my heart skip a beat as I thought to myself, ‘I get that – that’s what I’m looking for right now’.
    I’ve found that as a person, I’ve changed quite a bit in the last few years and the people I thought once understood me, don’t anymore. I sort of feel apart from people these days, like I’ve grown and sort of left them behind. But I’ve recently come to the conclusion that some people grow, and some people don’t. The problem is somehow recognising that you’ve grown and that you need to leave those people behind eventually, otherwise you can’t keep growing.
    I participated in NaNoWriMo this month just gone, and I was somewhat disheartened when my boyfriend was one of the few people who asked if they could read what I’d written so far – I thought he should have been the first to ask. And while perhaps what I wrote was not brilliant and will never win any prizes, it had me in it. Little pieces of what’s inside me dotted throughout and it felt good to put myself in there – it’s my most favourite thing I’ve ever written. So you’re right – writing is cheaper than therapy, because writing allowed me to put some of that frustration into words, even though what I was writing had nothing to do with my real life situation.

    Anyway, I’ll end my overshare now. But thank you so much for sharing your thoughts – it’s nice to know that someone else has experienced similar feelings to myself at one point!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. “I’ve found that as a person, I’ve changed quite a bit in the last few years and the people I thought once understood me, don’t anymore. I sort of feel apart from people these days, like I’ve grown and sort of left them behind. But I’ve recently come to the conclusion that some people grow, and some people don’t. The problem is somehow recognising that you’ve grown and that you need to leave those people behind eventually, otherwise you can’t keep growing.”
      These words made me gasp out loud. Now I know precisely why my post hit you hard. I’ve left so many people behind now because I’m just not who I used to be. I’ve simply let them go and not been able to give a decent explanation. Like Joan Didion said, “I’ve already lost touch with a couple of people I used to be.” Sometimes, you just got to be your own person instead of waiting for others to tell you how to behave and who you gotta be.
      My Person inspired this article and he couldn’t stop telling me how much he loves my writing. I find it so odd WordPress chose this post. I know for a fact that I’ve written better things than this. I wrote this in one go with just a single proofread. It’s so personal and now that it’s viral it even makes me a tad nervous. So you see, it’s not always about what you think is your best work. As long as you don’t stop, your best work will always be second to your future best work.
      I’ve submitted to so many places and been rejected by at least half of them. I’ve told myself I’m not in it for views. But a writer without an audience can probably never find their work satisfaction. And I’d be lying if I said I’m not pleased as hell today.

      So great getting to hear from you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The funniest thing about the whole situation is that you don’t realise how much you’ve changed until you look at the people around you and see how much they are still the same!

        Like

  22. Writing is cheaper. As someone who is trying to stay clean, it’s just easier to get high sometime. I’m gonna try to continue sticking to writing, blogging
    30 days and counting

    Liked by 3 people

    1. 30 days is an amazing feat. I don’t know you or your story but I’m proud of you. Writing keeps us sane and it’s a better alternative than any kind of mind-altering substance.
      Hang in there!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks a million for the kind words and I will definitely take ur advice to keep writing. You do the same

        Liked by 1 person

  23. literaturegradstudent | Reply

    I wonder what was on those pages that had a mother tearing up what her daughter wrote. I never wrote anything that made someone tear it up after reading it. That’s kind of cool. Though I guess from reading this it might probably have been a bummer to actually live the moment described here.

    Like

    1. I’ll just go ahead and say this that it was nothing inappropriate. I suppose I’ll even say there were some lines from Gone With The Wind describing Scarlett O’Hara’s conflicting emotions, among many others.
      If you grew up in my house, you’d realize that for some parents freedom of thought, speech, expression in their children’s behaviour was considered rebellious and wrong.

      Like

  24. As they say, be careful what you wish for. It just might happen!

    Like

    1. So glad it did. I’m the King of Wishful Thinking.

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I’m curious as to why you think you can’t write? There are some posts I’ve started to read and couldn’t finish simply because the writing was clumsy or just not interesting. You my friend CAN WRITE! I was captivated by your every word and could not just leave without saying something.

    Thanks for sharing a piece of your happiness with us. I am truly happy for you since many of us are in search of some form of happiness but never truly find it.

    Keep writing. Life forces us to re-evaluate our goals and dreams from time to time but in the end our passions resurface and we delight in the love affair for the love once lost is found again aged as wine, sweeter than before. God bless!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. “Life forces us to re-evaluate our goals and dreams from time to time but in the end our passions resurface and we delight in the love affair for the love once lost is found again aged as wine, sweeter than before.”
      True to every word.

      Thank you for delighting in my happiness. I’m so close to finally getting what I want, it’s surreal. I feel like I’m in my own Wonderland and everything works on my side. I appreciate the faith you show in my writing and I will never forget. When I’m in the dumps concerning my writing, I will come back and read your words and get back on the writing caravan.
      God Bless you too!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you ^_^
        I better save them too for days when I forget.

        Looking back, I don’t even know where those words came from, they just flowed out – – inspired by your post. Perhaps God used me to send you a message…

        Like

  26. awesome words, awesome post. great!

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Reblogged this on Islam, Diaries, etc and commented:
    awesome words. awesome post.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. That’s fer sure!👍💜👌

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Reblogged this on asprettyasthesun and commented:
    Food4thought

    Like

  30. It is always interesting to read when people put their thoughts down on paper. Why we write? That is a good question and the answer as you have put down in this post is thought provoking. Will be following you !!!

    Like

  31. Reblogged this on Identity Mania and commented:
    Yet very few people realizes this.

    Like

  32. Reblogged this on habibsheikh and commented:
    It really is true after all. Definitely cheaper THAN drugs. :’)

    Like

    1. I haven’t tried any, to be honest!

      Like

      1. I have, and it made me happy. But writing makes me fresher and joyful.

        Like

        1. Then writing is a clear winner. Fair and square.

          Like

  33. Your thoughts are exquisite. 🙂

    Like

  34. This is such an empowering piece. I find it almost hilarously ironic that whilst you choose to write about not being able to write, you have expressed it perfectly in your words xx much love 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you so much! Oh, the irony did not escape me. I was confused at first and then I just went along with all the love. xx

      Like

  35. It’s freaky to read words that so closely match your own thoughts. But also reassuring to know I’m not the only one that has those thoughts. I’ll be sharing this on my own blog.

    Like

    1. It means the world to me that someone I don’t know can find solace in my thoughts. Thank you for the share. x

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Reblogged this on The Uphill Factor and commented:
    So many of my own thoughts in this. Just add dance.

    Like

  37. That is defiantly true.

    Like

  38. Yea dude… Love is the way… Great post/just went thru the a similar phase….i stopped thinking about thinking and started doing again….thank god for the peeps im lucky enough to call friends n fam…. Grass is never greener on the other side, (cuz the other side isnt ours…) Hope ya find ur way thru as well…

    Like

    1. Imagining the grass to be greener on the other side was what got me through. Soon enough I realized the other side is only what you can make of it and not an all elusive land waiting to be discovered. So doing what you love and what makes you happy is the best way. Good luck to you.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ty dude.. 🙂 and gluck to you as well…

        Like

  39. I love this! I have the same issue. I think about writing so much but I can never actually write when I’m craving it! Also when I’m driving I’m writing in my head but by the time I’m home….NOTHING! I enjoyed this btw… 🙂

    Like

    1. When I’m driving or travelling I have entire posts already mentally written and then they vanish when I sit to type. I always make it a point to have a notebook with me (sometimes my cell phone notes) so I can jot down pointers. Later, I go back and polish them and it works out in my favour!
      Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  40. I loveeee how you’re so vulnerable and open, I really do.

    Like

    1. Thank you. I wasn’t so nervous about being this vulnerable when I wrote it but when way too many people started reading, I was a touch concerned. Everyone’s just been super kind to me, so I’m happy now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re a great person, i admire people like you.

        Like

        1. Thank you. I’m honestly so humbled right now, you have no idea.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Thats okay though! Always stay humble my friend 🙂

            Like

  41. mustaphabarki2014 | Reply

    Reblogged this on Engineering WordPress 2015.

    Like

  42. This post is wonderful!
    I have also faced similar situations with my family and with my writings too. I never find them good enough but it makes me happy to scribble down my silly thoughts. And I must say I am feeling inspired by you 😀 😀
    Stay blessed! (y)

    Like

    1. Facing opposition to your freedom of speech and thought is probably the biggest motivation to stand up and take control. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. I feel so pleased to have inspired you. Keep writing. God Bless.

      Liked by 1 person

  43. Thank you for such an impacting reminder of why we write; something only those who write understand. In ‘ Why my blog is important, I felt the same way; I went down to ‘Nitty Gritty’ of how writing gives me a reason to write whether in journal entry, poetry or my various novels at their various stages.
    It’s reassuring that someone out there knows what it means exactly to love to write and depend on writing; just as much as writing depends on your input.
    Words can’t express my gratitude and appreciation for this blog.

    Like

    1. The why’s of writing are infinite. If you find even one good reason to overcome the resistance and sit down and write, half the battle is won. I will go read your article in a while because it sounds like I would completely relate.
      Words can’t express my humble gratitude for your kind words. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. This post was really lovely. I’ve always been one to share but I’m new to writing of any kind. I agonize over how to make sense of all that goes on in my mind. However, the reason I did end up creating a blog is to shed my daily troubles, to avoid therapy and drugs.

    Like

    1. Writing is an escape, at first. Then suddenly it becomes something bigger than that. Before you know it, it’s the most reliable part of your life. Keep writing. Write obsessively. Just sit down and write.

      Like

      1. Thank you for your words of encouragement and motivation. I will continue to nuture my desire to write in the hopes that I will keep getting better.

        Like

      1. You are very welcome

        Liked by 1 person

  45. This is literally the best post I’ve ever read. Congrats! You are amazing!
    Netti xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much. Your comment made me smile so big. You’re pretty amazing yourself. xx

      Liked by 1 person

  46. Love this. And it’s a good reminder to read Didion’s book. Have been meaning to and still procrastinating. Quantum physics–that’s what it is when you wish for something, act to put legs on it, and it actually happens. Or so they tell me. Sounds crazy, right? But there’s something to write about:).

    Like

    1. From my personal experience, Didion’s books once opened are so difficult to put down. In the past few months, I’ve literally attempted to read everything she’s written. She inspires me and she gives me courage. Thank you for your comment. x

      Like

  47. Glad you found a heart-relevant and mind-relevant passion: blogging. And so accessible which spins into online reader friendships.

    Keep on blogging! I actually treat my blog almost my own photo album, memoir that I like to revisit, reread good memories.

    Like

    1. My virtual friendships are the most precious ones to me. To connect with people across time and distance is a different kind of joy.
      Thank you for your comment.

      Like

  48. like your writing, it seems coming from your heart. i always believe, what people write is what ini their mind. it just like talking to someone about experince writer endured. i’m your new fans..

    Like

    1. I appreciate your words very much. Thank you! Readers like you make everything possible.

      Like

  49. unbelievablyunbounded | Reply

    For me, reading and writing have always been two forms of escape. In reading, I escape the world around me; in writing I escape my mind. Your writing was brilliant, clear, and very relatable. I’m glad you are so happy that you feel as if you have trouble writing about it (although I disagree, your writing is magical). Thank you.

    Like

    1. Your thoughts about reading and writing mimic mine so strongly! I’m glad you could relate to my words and I feel truly humbled by your appreciation. All my gratitude for making my day even better. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  50. couldn’t agree more. this post encourage me to write more in my blog

    Like

    1. Thank you, I’m glad it did.

      Like

      1. You’re welcome (: I find the post rather relatable somehow ^.^

        Like

  51. Who says you can not write!
    This is amazing!!
    i do not know why your mother never let you keep excerpts from books.
    But if the result is writing like this then amazing.
    Awesome post!!

    Like

    1. Like the Mary Oliver poem, “Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift.”

      Thank you very much for your kind words. I’m humbled.

      Liked by 1 person

  52. thank you for this post. I especially love the part about family and how happy it is, when a family gets finished with itself and we can move on. I can’t write, either, but love doing it and feel at home here with people who can. : )

    Like

    1. That was the hardest part for me to write actually. To think that way is one thing. To go out there and write it, affirm it, is another ball game. Just find your own people, your own tribe, the kind of people that get you and let you do your own thing.
      Keep writing. Overcome the resistance. Good luck.

      Like

  53. Omg! I found myself nodding in all the thread. Let me guess, you are a type of person that when you have no one around, you will just be fine. I am delighted to know a person more like me. Jotting down notes and marking the pages thinking i might be able to use it when I write, and the hoarding of books, and the thought that writing is the cheapest medicine. Glad to know you Sloppy Etymology.

    Like

    1. I’m the biggest social hermit I know of. I love that you do the same little things I do concerned to writing. It’s quite adorable and makes me nod in mutual understanding. Glad to know you, too! x

      Liked by 1 person

  54. It is so true that writing is cheaper than therapy or drugs. I read alot but at times I feel that I am not the one who comes under writing list. I think that I am not good with words or with writing. But when I am depressed or when I am angry, I just write whatever comes in my mind. After that the depression goes away from me and I feel light. When I did this first I was amazed and thought writing is cheaper than drugs.

    Like

    1. I’ve realized over time that writing is the best escape there is. It requires courage but the joy and release after the fact is beyond compare. Don’t ever stop writing. It helped me, and I can assure you it’ll always be there for you.

      Like

  55. Reblogged this on 1writesanything Blog and commented:
    Repost.
    The topic strike me. Yes, you are right– Writing is Cheaper than Therapy or Drugs.. 😀

    Like

  56. I’ve written my whole life – well since, Miss Simon encouraged my stories in grade four – but still the wrong reaction to my words from one person (who couldn’t have known the destructive power of her criticism) put me off completely a novel. Some days, having published other work now, I can’t believe I let that happen. I just can’t believe it. You have risen above far more and I respect that. Years ago a well known Canadian author told me that the most important quality a writer needs is perseverance. So true. Stay calm. Let’s write on.

    Like

    1. I loved every word you just said and I know what it’s like to be told you’re not good enough by someone. Especially someone who you expected would tell you otherwise. Looking back I think everything that happens does happen for some reason and if you take the pain and make something out of it, with words, it’ll all get better, eventually.
      A book I recently read also said something along the same lines: There’s a secret that real writers know that wannabe writers don’t, and the secret is this: It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write. What keeps us from sitting down is Resistance.

      Like

  57. Truly heartfelt writing doesn’t feel like reading. It feels like a conversation. And that is what I felt as I read through this post. I’ve loved your command over the language and the fact that your screen name screams the origin of words is proof of your sense of humor. Growing up I had more books than friends can totally understand what you mean by it allowing you to escape your less than inspiring surroundings. I love that you have spoken about growing up and leaving people behind it seems such a selfish thought in your own head till you put it in words and see that you are not the only one who feels that way! Very happy that you have found happiness but let that not deter your writing as you truly have a gift with words. I find I write the best at my happiest even though it was the sadness, loneliness and despair which pushed me to write in the first place. Here’s to plenty more of these honest conversations !!

    Like

    1. Surprisingly you’re the only person who mentioned the name of my blog and the slight wordplay involved in it. I appreciate it a great deal. Sometimes it’s good to know something you’ve put a lot of thought in hasn’t gone entirely wasted.
      I think the world we live in currently has invariably instilled in us that if we aren’t sacrificing our deepest desires only to keep others happy, we are selfish. Anyone I know – from the country I come from at least – who has stood up for what they want and gone against what their family wanted from them has suffered the harshest kind of moral torture there is. It’s awful that choosing happiness for yourself is now equal to being selfish. My family, on several occasions, has told me that I’ll never change and that I’ll take what I can get from them and when the time is right, I’ll abandon them. While their words aren’t entirely untrue I feel like they abandoned me long back when they put down my dreams and aspirations and didn’t let me do the things I wanted. Unlike love, animosity, deep rooted dislike can never just appear one-sided. It takes two to do that tango. Sorry, I’ll stop with this sad talk..
      Thank you for your comment and I promise to keep it honest in all my writing as I can see it gets the best response. Good luck to you. Thank you for your words, I am so humbled.

      Like

  58. Your last paragraph got me, boom, right in the sternum. Yes, families do end. One of mine is a shell, the other was never really mine to begin with. But the next one, the safe place in someone’s heart, is some time away because I haven’t left this place yet, this place I called home in my youth that I thought I could go back to only to find I could not. So I wait, blog stagnant, old entries hidden, and I think about the article due at noon that is still 800 words from finished, and I type with my thumb on my phone telling you this at 5:36 a.m.

    Like

    1. Home is a place I never fit in fully.
      When I wrote those lines, I don’t know what happened. The rest of the blog just wrote itself. That’s not how I had planned on it to end but there’s that type of writing that writes you instead of the other way round.
      I don’t know your story, but somehow I feel like I already do. Sometimes cutting off a toxic part of your life is the only way to move on. I’m fortunate I have someone who can love me and respect me unconditionally when all else goes down.
      Oh, I have been there, too. Hidden blog entries. In fact, entire hidden blogs. I’ve been afraid and I’ve been scared to do what I love most. Writing. But ultimately that’s what got me through.
      Thank you for your comment. It made me bawl over a bit but also reassured me that I’m not alone in this. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

      Like

  59. This article was wonderful, it really spoke to me. Your writing is so simple but great and easy to read. I look forward to reading more. http://givingitmybestblog.wordpress.com

    Like

    1. I’m glad you could relate to it. It means so much to me. Thank you for your kind words. I’m deeply humbled.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Your welcome and thank you for following.

        Like

  60. I like the subject matter(s). Sounds like something i wish i could collect myself well enough to write. Thoughts are fleeting and very hard to catch. Making sense of and writing these thoughts is no easy feat. I love the way this piece flowed. Sounded like i was reading your mind. Cool.

    Like

    1. I speak my mind a fair bit. Sometimes, almost cruelly so.
      Writing this blog took something out of me. But when I read lovely comments such as yours, I was rest assured that I’m not alone. Thank you very much for expressing your appreciation. It honestly means the world to me. Readers like you make everything possible. I can never tire saying that.

      Liked by 1 person

  61. wow!! your post really inspire me to keep on blogging

    Like

    1. I’m happy to know I inspired you. Good luck.

      Like

  62. Thank you for being an example of a writer who found someone who encourages and understands your writing 🙂

    Like

  63. Reblogged this on Maureen E. Hogan and commented:
    Agreed

    Like

  64. Reblogged this on MeanderThings and commented:
    Agreed

    Like

  65. I believe that writing is one way of keeping us sane. It helps us observe our thoughts and feelings. It is really a good outlet, therapy.

    Like

    1. I completely side with you on this.

      Liked by 1 person

  66. I agree. I recently wrote a poem and was unsure of the meaning until I finished–if that makes sense. I’ve gone to therapy. It works for a lot of people. It didn’t work for me. But writing does work because it allows me to put all my ideas in an organized form and helps me better comprehend my own feelings. I like this post and I can relate to it.

    Like

    1. Therapy did not work for me because it was not entirely professional in the sense that what I shared was never kept private.
      Thank you and I’m so glad you could relate to this!

      Liked by 1 person

  67. Great read. I am not the best writer but I feel like it’s my way of getting my emotions out. It’s easier for me to express my emotions through writing rather than aloud. I totally agree that writing is therapy. I look back on past entries and see how far I have come. I also relate about not fitting in with family. I have never felt like they understood me.

    Like

    1. I’ve had people not listen to my words well enough as I would’ve liked them to. I took to writing and realized I didn’t have to be heard so loud, when I could simply write. I look back a lot to my past entries, too and it fills me with another kind of exhilaration.
      Being understood by your family is such a beautiful gift and I honestly believe those who are lucky enough should value it. Remember, families are invasive and insidious and they know exactly where the nail fits and where it hurts. There’s no harm in realizing people who are not related to you by blood could love and care about you more than your family ever could. Don’t ever lose heart. Go out and find your own tribe.

      Like

  68. After only the first few sentences, I followed you. This blog post really made me realize that other writers feel the same as I do when it comes to our own work. Don’t doubt yourself, you’re a fantastic writer!

    Like

    1. Thank you so much. I’ll try to keep that in mind but it’s so easy to belittle yourself sometimes. I’ll come back here and reaffirm it, though because I’m keeping your words forever. Thank you.

      Like

  69. You can always edit anything you dont like

    Like

    1. I am surprised how that never occurred to me before.

      Like

      1. You’re welcome!

        Like

  70. Reblogged this on usherclass and commented:
    Usherclass

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  71. Your title brought me here. This is a fantastic read – both the blog and the comments/replies. It really feels good to find so many like minded people. I have always found writing a real stress buster, but other responsibilities would push this to the last in the priority list. Now I feel inspired to go on. Thank you for that. I am going to come back here whenever my confidence level goes down 🙂

    Like

    1. Thank you for your words. I’m ever so humbled. Keep writing and remember that words have power and in writing, anything is possible as long as you sit down and write. Just write.

      Like

  72. You know, you are on to something. When I read your post it was almost if you took the words right put of my head. See, I have been feeling this way in my later years as an adult. When I was young, I hated reading and writing because my mom would nag me to do it so much be it homework, a speech, a thank you letter; yet, now, I can’t stop thinking about writing. My inconsistencies manifest when I make that transition: “When I can’t write, I read” notion. Believe me, I’m getting better at transcendence in my thoughts and moving them to print. Sloppy, I won’t take up all of your comments section but I’ll be sure to look for more revelations such as these.

    Like

    1. Firstly, you can come here and write how much ever you please in my comments section. The more I get to read and know people, the better I feel. And when someone says they connect to my words or are inspired by them, I reach another level of happiness altogether.
      Good luck with getting your writing in print. Everything that follows that will be surreal, I imagine. Thank you for reading. Thank you for leaving such wonderful words on my blog I can go back read and relive. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

      Like

  73. Writing is a place where passion meets love …

    Like

  74. Beautifully written. I can definitely relate. Glad you found happiness. 🙂

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    1. I’m thankful for your kind words. Yes, I’ve found happiness in the truest form.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I look forward to hearing more about it. 🙂

        Like

  75. Thank you, your blog has inspired me!

    Like

    1. I’m so happy about that. Thank you!

      Like

  76. Thanks so much for this read 👍

    Like

    1. Thank you, for reading!

      Like

  77. globalchemistltd | Reply

    writing about it is as much a therapy https://buyecstasypillsandmdmaonline.wordpress.com/

    Like

  78. You write really very deep. And yes finding someone who understands you is really lucky.

    Like

    1. Thank you. I know, I thank my stars!

      Liked by 1 person

  79. Writing is a therapy in itself. It aids self analysis and breeds inner exploration. I think the thought ‘to write or not to write’ becomes an urgency, an OCD and an uncontrolled decision. Talent in writing comes purely from our comfort in our cognitions and expressing these. The world is a diverse place and beauty is in the eye of the beholder 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. When it becomes that kind of an urgency and obsession you have to drop everything you’re doing and write. I absolutely love that feeling. I suppose if I was social and went out a lot, I would have to excuse myself when that feeling hits me unexpectedly.
      Thank you for your wonderful comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  80. Really touching post

    Like

    1. Thank you. And a bigger thank you for that mail! I’ll keep it with me forever.

      Like

  81. I just started blogging literally two days ago and it was a terrible first attempt but I knew I had to, I needed to write right in that moment. It was after I’d just come back from visiting my home and I was just utterly depressed because that’s what happens when I go home and up until today I had never found anyone I could share this feeling with. I just feel like I looked into my soul for a moment there, the incident with your mom, your love of reading from that early on, All Me! It’s insane but I look back to my childhood and there’s one moment that I feel was a defining moment in my life. This was the first time I ever considered suicide, I came home from school to find my mom sitting on the couch and right next to her lay my diary. The moment and the realization of what had just happened paralysed me, I felt stuck in that moment and although she never said anything I knew a part of me was broken because my words were sacred to me. Thank you for this post. Thank you for sharing your heart because it reminded me how we’re never alone in our experiences.

    Like

    1. I honestly don’t know where to begin from. After I read your comment I just had to pause and breathe in deeply. All I can say is, I wrote this as a means of coping. I wrote this to let it all out. Something so personal I couldn’t share with anyone and then I put it out there and I had no idea someone else could’ve gone through the very same. It’s so awful, so tricky when someone chances upon your words that weren’t meant for their eyes. I think you made the most life changing decision ever, two days ago, when you sat down and started blogging. Don’t ever give up. It’s taken me two years to write like this but even then I can’t escape my past. I have my falterings, my moments of weakness and failure. However, it’s the only way for dealing with our overactive minds and ever sensitive hearts. For people like you and me it’s the best outlet. So thank you, and thanks for leaving this comment. It warms my soul.

      Like

  82. Words are powerful, and reading is knowledgable input. The ability to write from the heart, hich is bluntly how it is against what people tend to do from the mind which is telling you what people want to hear.

    Like

    1. I agree with you completely!

      Like

  83. That is just awesome

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  84. I wish I could fully articulate how beautiful, moving, and in a way, inspiring this post was. All your feelings, thoughts, doubts, and lingering questions are ones I’ve experienced, have been enslaved by, and have given more power than I would publicly admit. The power of the written word is one that cannot be matched. Writing is freeing; it takes you places, it shows you new worlds, and it allows one to grow and explore and learn. Thank you so much for writing such as honest post.

    Like

    1. You’ve articulated it perfectly, so much so, I am blushing a great deal right now. I’m glad you could relate to my post so much. I guess, no matter how you feel, you must remember you are not alone. That, itself, should give you the strength. Thank you very much for reading. Readers like you make everything possible.

      Like

  85. This is the reason I writte! lol It is also a way to keep creativity tuned well

    Like

  86. Great article. I’m a poet and writing is my therapy. I always felt that writing took me away from the realities of the world but not the realities of the thoughts in my head. All I can say is keep writing!!!

    Like

    1. I love that you write poetry. I’ve dabbled in that and not had a great deal of luck. Keep at it. Good luck.

      Liked by 1 person

  87. Yes you are right writing does kill

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    1. I’m not sure I said that, really.

      Like

  88. I couldn’t have said it better myself. While going through a really hard time in my life, I lost my ability to write. It became such a dark, sad world. I remember a day that I sat at my kitchen table and watched the clock hands whirl around. Thankfully, at about 11 at night, the words came back to me. I’m still on a journey to get them completely back for good. I’d be honored of you read my new blog post as I am very proud of it. It finally feels like my life is going where I need it to go and it’s all because I can write again! Thank you!

    Like

    1. I’ve given up on my writing several times. I even deleted an entire blog once only to find that I couldn’t do without it. I know how hard it is to be word broken. To not be able to write for whatever reason. But remember, it won’t be like that forever. Writing comes back when you need it. Don’t ever give up on it. Thank you for stopping by and writing such a heartfelt comment. It means the world to me.

      Liked by 1 person

  89. This is a good post. 😀

    Like

  90. Wow! Enjoyed reading.. Its really amazing

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  91. Hey it’s very good, a little inspired from it too, it was truthful and powerful

    Like

    1. Thank you. I love that you feel inspired.

      Liked by 1 person

  92. Reading your words is like unravelling another part of me. I understand you and relate to every word.😊

    Like

    1. I appreciate that you can understand me. It’s so difficult to find people who do. Thank you for your precious words.

      Liked by 1 person

  93. Writing doesn’t kill yourself at all.

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    1. I’m not sure it does. Quite the opposite.

      Like

  94. Reblogged this on Some Good Eats.

    Like

  95. Reblogged this on lifeisakuki and commented:
    Read it!

    Like

  96. I loved your lines about writing in your head. Before I fall asleep at night, at least weekly, I compose articles and short stories of all kinds in my head, so excited about my ideas that I can’t sleep for hours, only to wake up in the morning and find them utterly pointless. I too am trying to hone my writing skills because, as an avid reader, I understand how much writing can affect another person. Your style is truly beautiful, and please pursue any dreams with writing you have. You can’t accomplish them if you don’t try, and one can only be satisfied with anonymity for so long.

    Like

    1. I do that a lot at night. The peak hours are always around 3am. I guess having a notebook or something to scribble on handy does help. When you’re fresh later you can organize your random thoughts and make sense out of them. I love that you’re an avid reader. That’s the most wonderful thing anyone can say about themselves. Like Haruki Murakami said, “Have books ‘happened’ to you? Unless your answer to that question is ‘Yes,’ I’m unsure how to talk to you.”
      Thank you for your wonderful comment. I’ll keep it with me forever.

      Like

  97. Thank you so much for your post! I love the way you write! It’s an innate ability to touch lives with your writing.
    Please follow me.

    Like

    1. Thank you for your comment. I’ll go look at your blog and follow it if I feel like it.

      Like

  98. Reblogged this on Zera Today Blog.

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  99. I love this. I am a writer also. I feel your pain. I am just glad there are people out there like me who understand.

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    1. I’m so thankful that there are people like you.

      Like

  100. Reblogged this on My life in letters and commented:
    No truer words have been spoken.

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      1. You are welcome 🙂

        Like

  101. I’ve learned (a little late) that reading improves writing—any story, anything. So you did, and were doing the right thing in going back, and it shows, here.

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    1. Thank you. I agree completely.

      Like

  102. Writing really change someones personality

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  103. I mean, fuck. It’s like I wrote this, but different, you know? Different execution, but same arrival.

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    1. Uh huh, I know. Trust me.

      Like

  104. madelfoxphilippines | Reply

    Reblogged this on Madel's.

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  105. […] else fails, you could, well, do what I did, and (try my damnmest to) become a writer.  At least writing is cheaper than therapy or drugs.  (Maybe.)  (And writing is in itself a form of therapy, and sometimes a drug—“the next […]

    Like

  106. Thank you. Thank you for writing this and thank you for sharing your struggels, both current and past. I fully relate to what you’ve written… I used to read constantly as well as write [to get it out]. I stopped both and for years i have wanted to get bck to that but several things are holding me back. Mostly internal fears – of failure and success. It’s been a frustratingly halted process but your words have inspired me to continue trying; to go on. Thank you again, your post has helped me more than I can express at this time. Please keep doing what you are doing. I hope you find the internal permission to write your happiness- you deserve it!

    Like

    1. I’ve given up reading many times but always come crawling back. It is beyond love, you know? I’m glad this post helped you in whatever way it did and I hope you never stop reading and writing. Thank you so much for your kind words. I’m humbled.

      Liked by 1 person

  107. I wished that a special friend would stay in my life. It became true 🙂

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  108. Tyra (Random Acts of Snark) | Reply

    Reblogged this on Random Acts of Snark.

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  109. I’m so sorry about your mother tearing up your pages. I can’t imagine trying to keep it all in my head – I rely on libraries and my notebooks to keep it all safe. Only recently have I found a few friends who are encouraging me to follow my dreams, and it is the most precious thing in the world. Best of luck to you.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much. We find a way through it all. It’s human nature.

      Like

  110. Reblogged this on WITNESS.

    Like

  111. Reblogged this on genuine15 and commented:
    Really writting kills

    Like

  112. […] believe that posts like this, are not going to be too frequent here. They take something out of me and I can only put so much of […]

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  113. yupp… I do agree..

    Like

  114. Thank you for sharing with us, I love your honesty.

    Like

    1. I’m thankful that you appreciate it!

      Like

  115. I agree completely. There’s something terrifying yet liberating about writing. The kind of writing where you’re not even sure what you’re writing until it’s done.

    Like

    1. Oh, those are my breakthrough articles when I have no idea where they might go. The best writing often takes you in unknown territories. It’s the most exhilarating sensation there is.

      Like

      1. You’re welcome:-)

        Like

  116. I wanted to say you’re words have articulated perfectly the common everyday struggles of my own practice in life. The creative discovery is one of the most absolutely breath taking Endeavours an individual can pursue in my own opinion. It is so uplifting to hear about another who has struggled coming to a place of comfort in expression and has found a place to rest for the night. Please continue what you do and I will do the same. Even though I do not know you I do. It is threw the bond of exploration of the self is where our relationship lay and I do hope to hear from you one day.

    Like

    1. Aren’t we all united in the effort that we put in our creative endeavours for reaching that elusive sense of satisfaction. I know you just as you know me. Do what you love and do it tirelessly. Against all odds. It’s something I’ve realized after a long time and I want to keep at it. The world is often more afraid of us than we are of it.

      Liked by 1 person

  117. Reblogged this on IN EVERYDAY… and commented:
    A must read if needing clarification.

    Like

  118. I have just finished this article and I must admit that I am crying and shaking uncontrollably. Thank you so much. This was just truly beautiful. I hope that you never stop feeling in this manner about your writing or having such a perspective on life because I would be truly sad!

    Like

    1. I’m almost not sure how to say this but your words mean EVERYTHING to me. Oh goodness, you have no idea. Let me explain, please.

      Sometimes you read something and it tears you apart in a way no living thing could. No experience of pain, no measure of sorrow or grief can be as insidious as reading something that hurt you, moved you, made you cry to a point where you shake uncontrollably. I’ve read quite a few pieces like that and been so inspired to be like those authors. I feel like I was made for that, you know. To enter my readers’ minds and rip them apart with prose. Only to surprise them and overwhelm them with emotion. To make at least one person read something and realize that they’re forever changed after what I had to say, that they come to my words at 3 AM and weep silently because there will be no other reality tonight – except the one created by my words.

      So when you say that, you don’t know how much you’ve inspired me and pleased me and made me believe in myself. I’m in a wonderful place right now and looking forward to beautiful experiences in a matter of days. I will try my best to keep writing because this, right here, the reward through such confessions made by absolute strangers, is greater, more priceless than anything I’ve ever received.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is why it moved to that point! I feel the same way about words! And actually, your piece inspired me to write once more. Thanks so much!

        Like

  119. Reblogged this on xngelamaningas and commented:
    “I can, however, trust people I’ve never met. It’s something I do effortlessly.”

    Like

  120. It’s as if you have put all my thoughts and feelings in a single article. Spot on. I’ve tried and tried but it seems like I couldn’t fully express nor find the right words to pour my heart out in writing. And you’re amazing at it. 👏 I hope one day I’d be able to do that as well.

    Like

  121. livedlearndandloved | Reply

    writing is the best therapy.

    Like

  122. Reblogged this on delapurwandani and commented:
    More than words

    Like

  123. Reblogged this on cup of kt.

    Like

  124. […] I am stuck with a question, though. Why did I decide to grab my pen again? What is more, why did I even decide to punch these words onto this until-now blank entry? Truth is, I am most likely doing it because, once more, I have connected to another human being through, what I consider to be, the noblest of the manners: through this person’s writing. […]

    Like

  125. I like it!!! Reading is also cheaper 😄 I have some really good stories do you mind checking out my blog sometime? beautifulremedies.wordpress.com

    Like

    1. I shall definitely take a look!

      Like

  126. Reblogged this on TwisterReed's Blog and commented:
    Amen

    Like

  127. This is completely wonderful. Very happy to hear about your recent successes. Keep it up, buttercup!

    Like

    1. Thank you. I will do my best!

      Like

  128. Very interesting insight. I have found that just the right balance of drugs and writing work for me. Cheers!

    Like

    1. Haha, that’s good for you!

      Liked by 1 person

  129. Thank you for sharing your story. It is very true writing has some kind of a holistic effect by simply pouring out those thoughts into words. It releases pain. It heals. Goodluck.

    Like

    1. I’m glad you feel that way. Take care.

      Like

  130. That poem…it broke me just enough to let your note on destiny work a type of magic I cannot explain. I know that kind of love. And I thank you for giving me another perspective on it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am sorry that it upset you. But I’m glad you have a better perspective now. Thank you for that comment. I’m keeping it forever.

      Like

  131. I love this post … and despite the fact that I feel inadequate as a writer, I hope you will take it as a compliment that I think you write very well.

    Writing is definitely cheaper than therapy – and that idea is the theme of another blog I came across: http://lettersfrozen.wordpress.com/.

    Like

    1. Thank you so much. I’m humbled.

      Love that blog you linked. I want to submit there!

      Like

  132. Why not combine the two? It coooould work. Proof of concept: Alice in Wonderland. You can’t tell me that it was thought up normally.

    Rachel
    rachelbeingchatty.wordpress.com

    Like

    1. You’re not the first person to tell me that, hehe.

      Like

  133. Amazing!!! Truly amazing!!! You write so beautifully, I can feel the emotions pouring out from this story! Thank you so much for sharing this story with us. My first love is also reading, when i was younger i was always reading at least two books at a time. Reading and writing has helped me through many a hard time in my life, and I wouldn’t be the same without them! Again Thank you for writing and sharing it with us, I am looking forward to reading more of your writing!

    Like

  134. Oh my… if a parent had tried to tear up my words I’d have thrown all my toys out of the pram. They corrected my spelling once and I blew a fuse…I’m glad it didn’t stop you xx

    Like

  135. Lovely interesting read … Thanks for sharing your thoughts 🙂

    Like

  136. Your blog is so deep and i can relate to exactly what you wrote. I been through ups and downs in my writing but what i have come to realize is that writing does so much to the heart and mind.

    Liked by 1 person

  137. We can use all types of support for our minds and bodies.

    Like

  138. all I can say is thank you ….

    Like

  139. So true .it works for me i feel relaxed after i write what is bothering me.

    Like

  140. Reblogged this on Girl undressed .

    Like

  141. Words have endless power. Writing can bring inner feelings of a person out, but also detect the worst character of that person. When I have bad moments, I write. I write for my mind, I write for my heart, I write out all of my bad thoughts. It is the best method to let people understand you and more importantly, let you see the real you.

    Like

    1. I know precisely what you mean. Writing is the best recreation there is. Don’t ever stop.

      Like

  142. adventurejuvenileauthor | Reply

    Writing can take you to places never before seen or heard of. What is so wrong with fantasy?

    Like

  143. Reblogged this on myonlysweetmarie and commented:
    COVER STORY

    Writing to heal

    By helping people manage and learn from negative experiences, writing strengthens their immune systems as well as their minds.

    By BRIDGET MURRAY

    Monitor Staff

    June 2002, Vol 33, No. 6

    Print version: page 54

    Writing is no stranger to therapy. For years, practitioners have used logs, questionnaires, journals and other writing forms to help people heal from stresses and traumas.

    Now, new research suggests expressive writing may also offer physical benefits to people battling terminal or life-threatening diseases. Studies by those in the forefront of this research–psychologists James Pennebaker, PhD, of the University of Texas at Austin, and Joshua Smyth, PhD, of Syracuse University–suggest that writing about emotions and stress can boost immune functioning in patients with such illnesses as HIV/AIDS, asthma and arthritis.

    Skeptics argue that other factors, such as changes in social support, or simply time, could instead be the real health aids. But an intensive research review by Smyth, published in 1998 in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (Vol. 66, No. 1), suggests that writing does make a difference, though the degree of difference depends on the population being studied and the form that writing takes.

    Researchers are only beginning to get at how and why writing may benefit the immune system, and why some people appear to benefit more than others. There is emerging agreement, however, that the key to writing’s effectiveness is in the way people use it to interpret their experiences, right down to the words they choose. Venting emotions alone–whether through writing or talking–is not enough to relieve stress, and thereby improve health, Smyth emphasizes. To tap writing’s healing power, people must use it to better understand and learn from their emotions, he says.

    In all likelihood, the enlightenment that can occur through such writing compares with the benefits of verbal guided exploration in psychodynamic psychotherapies, notes Pennebaker. He notes, for example, that talking into a tape recorder has also shown positive health effects. The curative mechanism appears to be relief of the stress that exacerbates disease, researchers believe.

    Health benefits

    A groundbreaking study of writing’s physical effects appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Vol. 281, No. 14) three years ago. In the study, led by Smyth, 107 asthma and rheumatoid arthritis patients wrote for 20 minutes on each of three consecutive days–71 of them about the most stressful event of their lives and the rest about the emotionally neutral subject of their daily plans.

    Four months after the writing exercise, 70 patients in the stressful-writing group showed improvement on objective, clinical evaluations compared with 37 of the control patients. In addition, those who wrote about stress improved more, and deteriorated less, than controls for both diseases. “So writing helped patients get better, and also kept them from getting worse,” says Smyth.

    In a more recent study, presented in a conference paper and submitted for publication, Pennebaker, Keith Petrie, PhD, and others at the University of Auckland in New Zealand found a similar pattern among HIV/AIDS patients. The researchers asked 37 patients in four 30-minute sessions to write about negative life experiences or about their daily schedules. Afterward, patients who wrote about life experiences measured higher on CD4 lymphocyte counts–a gauge of immune functioning–than did controls, though the boost to CD4 lymphocytes had disappeared three months later.

    Regardless, the fact that they at first showed improved immune functioning suggests that it reduced their stress through a release of HIV-related anxiety, says Pennebaker. “By writing, you put some structure and organization to those anxious feelings,” he explains. “It helps you to get past them.”

    Other research by Pennebaker indicates that suppressing negative, trauma-related thoughts compromises immune functioning, and that those who write visit the doctor less often. Also, Petrie’s colleague Roger Booth, PhD, has linked writing with a stronger antibody response to the Hepatitis B vaccine.

    Writing right

    Not everyone agrees, though, that the mere act of writing is necessarily beneficial. In fact, initial writing about trauma triggers distress and physical and emotional arousal, researchers have found. And not all people will work through that distress therapeutically or through continued writing, says psychologist Helen Marlo, PhD, of Notre Dame de Namur University and a private practitioner in Burlingame, Calif. In past research, she found that, contrary to Pennebaker’s results, writing about negative and positive life events produced no physical health benefits in undergraduate students.

    “I get concerned that if people just write about traumatic events, they get raw and opened up and aren’t able to work through it on their own,” says Marlo. Her study did not, however, provide evidence that writing poses any long-term risk to people.

    But there is evidence that the nature of a person’s writing is key to its health effects, notes health psychology researcher Susan Lutgendorf, PhD, of the University of Iowa. An intensive journaling study (in press, Annals of Behavioral Medicine) she conducted recently with her doctoral student Phil Ullrich suggests that people who relive upsetting events without focusing on meaning report poorer health than those who derive meaning from the writing. They even fare worse than people who write about neutral events. Also, those who focus on meaning develop greater awareness of positive aspects of a stressful event.

    “You need focused thought as well as emotions,” says Lutgendorf. “An individual needs to find meaning in a traumatic memory as well as to feel the related emotions to reap positive benefits from the writing exercise.”

    In explaining this phenomenon, Pennebaker draws a parallel with therapy. “People who talk about things over and over in the same ways aren’t getting any better,” he says. “There has to be growth or change in the way they view their experiences.”

    Evidence of a changed perspective can be found in the language people use, Pennebaker has found. For example, the more they use such cause-and-effect words as “because,” “realize” and “understand,” the more they appear to benefit.

    Pennebaker also acknowledges that some personality types likely respond better to writing than others. Tentative evidence suggests that more reticent people benefit most. A host of other individual differences–including handling of stress, ability to self-regulate and interpersonal relations–also mediate writing’s effectiveness.

    A place in practice?

    After all, writing’s power to heal lies not in pen and paper, but in the mind of the writer, say a number of psychologists who use it with their patients. That’s where clinicians come in, helping clients tap that healing power, they say. Private practitioner Marlo, for example, employs writing cautiously–using it only with patients who take to it, and closely integrating it into the therapeutic process.

    “The cornerstone of therapy is engagement in the therapeutic relationship that addresses the individual’s process–especially the intrapersonal, interpersonal, affective and symbolic dimensions of experience,” says Marlo.

    Another practitioner, Judith Ruskay Rabinor, PhD, author of “A Starving Madness: Tales of Hunger, Hope and Healing in Psychotherapy” (Gurze Books, 2002), has her patients explore their anxieties in writings between sessions, e-mailing her as the anxiety strikes them. Rabinor offers feedback on their writing and helps them track progress in their thinking.

    Though more studies are needed, many behavioral researchers believe such approaches could also work with treating chronically ill people. “Writing is another potential tool in the armatorium of the clinical professional,” says Smyth.

    Like

  144. Great post! There is so much truth here. I write a blog about narcissism and being the survivor of narcissistic abuse, and I started the blog mainly as a form of self therapy due to not being able to afford a therapist. It’s become so much more than that in the 3 months I’ve had it, and I’ve changed. I’m much more self confident and rediscovered my love for writing. Finally I have a goal for the future–to parlay this into a writing career somehow. Before I started the blog I felt so lost and hopeless–I thought I lost everything good I had to offer. My blog is really an online journal and has helped me understand myself much better than any therapist ever did. It was the smartest thing I think I’ve ever done. Thank you for this excellent post.

    Like

    1. I see exactly where you’re coming from. And somehow your journey mimics mine in so many ways it’s difficult to explain. I wish you good luck in making this a career. It’s the best.

      Liked by 1 person

  145. Reblogged this on a safe place and commented:
    So much truth in this article. I started my blog as self therapy because I could not afford a therapist and by treating it as a sort of online journal, I think I’ve learned more about myself and my abusers in the past 3 months than I did in any time I ever spent in therapy. I’ve also rediscovered my love of writing and realized I haven’t lost my ability or ambition to turn this into something more. Finally I feel like I have goals in life again, I’m no longer one of the walking dead, and this article nails it, so I’m reblogging it.

    Like

  146. Never say you can’t write.

    Like

    1. I promise not to, henceforth.

      Like

  147. So true, My writing since I was a kid was as therapy for me. I build up stories, characters on the events that happened to me (good & bad) and it helped me so much.
    Even now I write for myself, just to get things out. Great post ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Writing for yourself is often the best. A writing advice I once came across was pick one person as your audience and write to them. For me it’s always myself.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Great advice 🙂 I write for myself as well, I need to love the story, so I can continue on with my story.

        Like

  148. I picked up the pen again last night and it is cathartic.

    Like

    1. Cathartic is my favourite word.

      Liked by 1 person

  149. Reblogged this on oruba.M.Farraj.

    Like

  150. So much of what you wrote I felt as a young person…I’m so glad you’re happy. Happiness for me can be so elusive some days, but on those days (which thankfully are fewer and fewer as I age) I try to honor my sadness (for a short time) and then find something to smile about! What I once viewed as life’s challenges, I now view as a humerous topic for my blog!!! I don’t have any CONTROL over what will or will not happen to me, but I do have CONTROL over my reaction to it, so I’ve decided that humor is the way to go…..has served me well over the years and has made me a happier old woman…Thank you for your post! Well written and expressed. Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!!! 🙂

    Like

    1. I feel like you’ve honestly figured out the best way to live life. I try hard to control my reactions but they just build up then and comes out in a burst of confusion and anger. Thank you for stopping by to add to my words. It means so much to me. I hope 2015 is doing a good job at keeping you happy. Much love.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are very welcome, Sweetie. And trust me, just when you THINK you`ve figured out how to/live life, “life” comes along and switches the rules on you! It’s just the way it is….Your writing is as beautiful as you are, Sweet Pea! Big hug! 💖

        Like

  151. Reblogged this on My Diary Blues and commented:
    This is amazing to me. Especially the last paragraph. Not sure if I’m being emotional, but felt the tears in my eyes. Lovely.

    Like

  152. Reblogged this on I'm Out Here and commented:
    So I write because its Therapeutic

    Like

  153. Well, I believe you just found yourself and your own words. Having a space in someone’s heart is having somewhere to call home. I’m really glad I read your words, I believe I’m inspired by them now, because we haven’t had the same problems or roads but we are sharing a feeling, and knowing you can break free from it. It’s inspiring.

    Like

    1. In whichever way I have inspired you, I do hope you can be motivated to write more. We all need to get things out of our system once in a while. Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  154. Reblogged this on lonnietalouise and commented:
    True words…

    Like

  155. The power of writing is amazing I’ve always loved reading and writing I think writing down one’s thoughts and ideas is a form of self expression. Thank you.

    Like

    1. You should keep at it! Good luck. And thank you for stopping by. It means a lot.

      Like

  156. Reblogged this on In Real Life.

    Like

  157. Completly Relate 😂🙌Love this post! Reading has forever been my one true love and my most effective escape. Nothing beats the feeling of snuggling up with a good book feeling the pages and just soaking up all the words and knowledge it has to offer. I prefer writing them partying all night or watching chick flicks. Writing amd reading are the best meds i have ever taken.

    Like

    1. I couldn’t agree more, Kiarra! Every word.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. kiarrakiki1999 | Reply

        IK! Few people can actually understand what I mean by that. Only a true book lover could know what it means to truly have a love and addiction to reading, and only a few people out of majority knows what it feels like to be absorbed in a book so much that you begin to leave reality and enter the realm of your novel.!
        Nice to Meet you fellow Book Lover 🙂

        Like

  158. Reblogged this on Daily Reads By Kiarra and commented:
    👌Very true

    Like

  159. Keep reading. Keep writing blogs. It is the best therapy out there. Sometimes you just need to be in your own head with the words. I don’t think there is a writer out there who hasn’t had moments like that – hell, maybe we all have had moments like that. Writers just feel the need (or have the ability) to share it. Thanks for sharing this glimpse into your head space. 😀

    Like

    1. It’s true. Write till you can overcome it. Like Joan Didion said that she writes to figure out her problems and solve them!

      Like

  160. I also believe- Painting is cheaper than therapy or drugs.

    Like

    1. Really, though. I thought about that and I’m pretty sure painting can get quite expensive.

      Like

      1. Good point. I shop at a discount art store- I pay 3.33 for an 18 x 20 inch canvas and 2.50 for a large tube of each color of paint on sale. I print a coupon and only shop with the coupon from the store. To get started is expensive (collecting all the paints) but now I spend 20$ a month and produce 5 paintings a month. I don’t use oil paint and I am limited to my canvas shape. Certain sizes of canvas never go on sale. I buy my 3 ft by 5 ft canvases with a 50% off one item coupon I print out. Thanks

        Like

  161. Riding the Life Coaster | Reply

    Reblogged this on Riding the Life Coaster.

    Like

  162. You and I…I think we’re twins. I’ve always been a poetry writer (and sometimes fiction if it tickles my fancy), but I am right there with you. My “good” stuff is from the darkest part of my life, and I am pretty sure that, subconsciously, I am afraid to let myself get too happy because I’ll lose my first true love (writing) all together. Keep writing. Keep inspiring. With love.

    Like

    1. Hey, you. Even in a few words I think you’ve convinced me we have a connection. It’s difficult to put out there that negative and dark things in my life are my major source of writing inspirations. But, like they say love can never be felt as deeply as loss. I think about the various connotations of that sentence and I’m dumbfounded at times. Having dabbled in my fair share of depression I can honestly say nothing has ever affected me as deeply and paved my way towards expression via writing.
      Thank you for your comment and more importantly for your love. It keeps me going.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am generally a bit self-absorbed in blogging, and don’t read anything other than my own stuff…but you are my first follow. I can’t wait to see more from you. Dumbfounded as well, but our common threads help us persevere. ❤

        Like

        1. I simply love your writing voice. I will shortly log in on my PC and devour your blog. Please have a wonderful day/night (I’m pretty sure we are in opposite time zones or something. Most of the people I’m compatible with are situated seven seas away from me, really).

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Thank you! 7:41pm here, negative temperatures and our power just went out. 🙂 so I will be up a while! Looking forward to much much more correspondence with you.

            Like

            1. Goodness me. We are in the same time zone! Thankfully no power outs yet for us. Stay warm, please.

              Liked by 1 person

              1. Trying!! You too. The cold is very bitter tonight.

                Like

  163. Reblogged this on Simply me, sans filter. and commented:
    I’ve never reblogged anything before, but I’m pretty sure I found my twin.

    Like

    1. I guess that unknown, constant, nagging feeling of being incomplete must’ve been the fact that I had yet to meet my twin. Someone who understands and can feel my thoughts and words as if they happened to them. Thank you. You’ve made my night.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you as well. Some relationships are without explanation but hold extremely strong healing power.

        Like

        1. Truest words ever spoken.

          Like

  164. […] recently stumbled upon Sloppy Etymology’s blog when her post ‘Writing is cheaper than therapy or drugs‘ surfaced on Freshly Pressed. I think she’s my twin. [I shared it to my blog yesterday; […]

    Like

  165. Reblogged this on Deviations on a theme and commented:
    I just started my own blog in an attempt to find my way through difficult times. Writing therapy is definitely cheaper.

    Like

  166. I just started my own blog in an attempt to find my way through difficult times. Writing therapy is definitely cheaper. I new to this genre and still finding my way around. (reblogged your post)

    Like

    1. Thank you! I hope you can keep at it and find yourself inspired, always!

      Like

  167. Reblogged this on curlyheart and commented:
    Must read

    Like

  168. I came across your blog unexpectedly and I must say that whatever you wrote is very real and I can somewhat relate to certain aspects of it. Hopefully you’ll kick on from here and get the true happiness you deserve 🙂

    Like

    1. Hello, thank you for your kind words. Unexpectedly stumbling on my blog and reading something you liked makes me feel like my purpose of writing has been met. I have definitely kicked off from here and it’s been months now and everything has worked out for the better.

      Liked by 1 person

  169. Wow. I get this, in my own way, see, because I can’t write either. I used to be able to write, in the great before. Before I got sick, before my epilepsy, before the drugs that took away my vocabulary, but then it was all gone. This is the place where I’ve learned to write again. Differently, completely differently, but words on a page all the same.
    Much love,
    Naptimethoughts

    Like

    1. Naptimethoughts are often the greatest. Let me just say that out loud right away.

      Hang in there and know that blogging and writing are means of recuperation if you’d like them to be. Write, write and write. Until it comes to you so naturally and so urgently that you can’t think about anything else and can’t do anything else but.

      Like

  170. I never had the kind of opposition to reading you had, but I shared the love of books and reading from my earliest memories. Books are something of an addiction for me, you see.
    Now, I am discovering the joy of reading blogs and finding other’s voices in the ether. May i add my voice to the chorus wishing you extended happiness and encouraging you to continue to write; to let the inner voices out to be loved and appreciated as well.
    My usual media for communication is spoken, the blog world is new to me (about a week or so old… so much to learn and see). Let us support one another on our journey.

    Phred.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I understand completely when you say books are an addiction. They are absolutely intoxicating. I find my writing voice differs vastly from my spoken word. I hope you strike a good balance between the two.
      Good luck on this blogging journey. Believe me Phred, only absolute good comes from it.

      Like

  171. I came on wordpress looking for answers , trying to find myself. I dont know what kind of answer I want. Right now I am clueless about almost everything. I have been reading , searching and I came across this beautifull piece of writing by you. Trust me it felt like someone was talking about me , answering my fears. I must tell you , it is an excellent piece of writing and I Thank You for it , seriously !

    Keep up the good work !
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello there, sometimes looking for answers is not always the easiest thing to do. Although the universe explains itself, eventually, when enough time has passed and when you reach a stage where you are capable of understanding the answer in a better way. I’m glad you could relate to the article. It means so much. So thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

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